Jump to content

Thanks for answering chatbox hunter and a few question's


RichM
 Share

Recommended Posts

For some reason it won't let me send a message on chatbox now. Im new to metal detecting this year but there are some thing's im confused on? 1 is that how the g2+ is a good coin machine, because when i have used mine the depth seems horrible and what i have really disliked it is the fact that if a target is a little deep like 4-5 inch's the machine won't even make a noise just flash's a id????Maybe im doing something wrong or have a bum machine but the machine is in great condition. My vanquish540 goes deep but seems like on even shallow target's the id just seems very spotty, shredded cans pop up as every ID it seems like. However in the pass week i am getting better on it and i found a 1891 dime the first good find with the vanquish  since i bought it. I thought the fisher f75 you would have held to a higher regard? I thought about replacing it with the vanquish evntually if it is good on coins and rings as far as depth. I got alot to learn as this is my first year ... Thank's...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrators

Hmm...I am not sure why it is not letting you post.  Try logging out and then back in.  I'll go check the settings to see what's up.  

The G2+ is one of the best pure coin shooters ever in my opinion.  Nothing other than a top end Minelab will lock onto a fringe depth  ID as well as it will.  That is very important for a coin shooter.  It also has a great disc circuit and Vbreak which works very well in iron and modern trash, being a great separator.  Since most coin shooters hit trashy parks - a detector with a stable ID and good aluminum work is a must.  G2+/F19 platform do very well there.  The only draw back for a coin shooter is depth.  The top end on a silver coin is likely to be 8-9 inches.  A respectable depth in my opinion...but not the foot deep stuff a Nox or Anfibio type detector can reach.  If it cannot hit a 4-5 inch coin - there may be an issue - or a setting that is not right somewhere.  I would try a factory reset and see if that helps at all.  

The V540 will for sure be deeper - especially in bad soil.  That is the whole point of multi-freq, so the G2+ will never match it there.  Shredded pop cans will fool just about all detectors - even a Nox 800.  I would not worry about that too much.  I would just stop hunting nickels when it gets frustrating, and focus on the higher numbers/tones.

The F75 is a great detector.  I love it - but even a Vanquish can beat it in bad soil depth and salty beach work.  Technology has changed as of late.  Even and G2+ will have a better ID lock that a F75.  Not as deep of course, but it will bang on coins better in my opinion.  

  • Like 3

spacer.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Rich, John's words are true. He knows his stuff.... i'm sure that you'll learn a lot if you stick with a specific detector of choice. My advice for what it's worth is to start the hobby by researching the machines in your price range, decide exactly what you require from a machine in relation to your types of available hunting, then go buy that machine, and no others, until you feel absolutely confident in yourself that you have totally mastered it. STICK TO ONE MACHINE until then. Bunny hopping from one machine to another is the first class way to become dissilusioned and confused.  As a comparison, it's unwise go buy a 600cc sports motorcycle until you have made your way to a 250 via a 125. All the best riders started on a 125 dirt bike and make their way through the classes in a given order. Get my drift?.. BTW Rich, the vast overwhelming number of high value finds are  seldom discovered any deeper than 6" to 8 inches; fact.... It's how you use the machine that suits Your requirements, and your ability to understand it totally, that brings success. It takes time, persistance, dogged determination and heaps of patience to succeed.  Fortunately for myself, when first I began metal detecting I was advised by a truly great metal detectorist; a 'lone wolf' , a real Master if you will. He was man who was one of the very finest exponents of the hobby in the U'K for his era. His hauls of gold iron Age staters and tiny quarter gold staters is un-matched to this very day! He literally made tens of thousands of £'s way back then!..He suggested  that I needed to adhere to the old saying, " Beware the man with only one gun, for he surely knows how to use it". His wisdom still holds true....His hauls of gold staters were found with late 1970s Tesoros, culminating in the legendary Tejon, but his preferred machine once XP brought it out was the excellent GoldMax Power....Says it all, for me.   Master that one good detector, and Then go buy a quality back up. Master them both and you're heading in the right direction to make your hunting a profitable pleasure. ..This is only my opinion Rich, and I am absolutely no 'expert', nor do I profess to be. What you do with your money and time is your decision alone. I'm only offering up my take. Good luck either way fella.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the info Hunter and thanks tim, i think in my head i imagined that targets would be one specific ID especially with multi frequency if they were more shallow.  I will try reseting the g2+, my biggest complaint with it is it hiting a ID but making hardley any noise wasn't sure if that is normal? The reason why i got into this hobby is because last winter i was looking up videos bored and happen to watch a huntergt md video on YT one day and then i started watching more and more(true story). I think i get frustrated because i wanna know everything and ive just got my feet wet in this hobby(like i want the depth and know what im digging exactley). My question's are not meant to challenge anyones knowledge just for the record, just when i think i know one thing i end up clueless. It's kinda sad but without hunters video on just pinpointer settings (f-pulse)  I think i would have gave up on it lol. Tim intresting enough i met a vietnam Vet with his son metal detecting 2 weekends ago and the son was the only one md'ing because the father has had a stroke and lost some use in his arm and trying to build back strenght. He said he has been doing the hobby 30-plus years and has over 100 rings , 47 being gold along with relics of all kind and other things. These guys were pro and blew me out the water, the son was using a whites spectrum 3vi and using a screw driver to dig with and he could locate something and have it outa the ground within second's it was crazy and neat. They told me one of the worst mistakes someone does is swings and moves to fast and to pick a spot and go over it slowly.

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Your questions show a willingness to learn Rich, which in turn shows your intelligence in doing so. That willingness makes helpful people offer their take on things. Cool....Regarding your G2+.  Did you buy it brand new, and if so is it within it's warranty still? If yes, I'd contact my dealership. If not, and performing a re-boot as John suggested still hasn't remedied the problem then perhaps give FT a call. Thankfully you live on the right side of the Pond, so postage for such a light machine to be sent to FT won't cripple you if they ask you to send it to them for repairs. DO NOT tinker with it yourself Rich, unless you are a professional electrical engineer specifying in MD's and have the appropriate equipment. FT are the people that 100% know. The man that gave you the advice regarding swing speed and hunting gave you sound advice. Low and slow is the way to go ( FT 75s require a, very slightly, brisker swing speed, but nothing approaching that of some you might witness on YT! One guy swings like he's on Amphet 😉. If you find a 'honey spot' pr'aps  mark a sensibly sized area out with sticks, stones or marker flags, if you use them, and hunt it thoroughly, over-lapping your swings as you search methodically up and down the grid. Also, please don't fall foul of the 'Maximum Gain/Sensitivity means more finds trap'. That misnomer only applys to very clean groung with very low mineralisation. Too much Sens/Gain throws a machine right out of harmony. It's discrimination goes all to hell in the fog : the tones 'scream instead of talk' due to distortion of tonal values. Whack up a radio set to a narrower wave-band music station. Listen to how the music sounds compared to when you had it set to a maximum ACCEPTIBLE level. MDs audio works along these lines, too. Don't go for 'overkill' go for quality of info. Unless that is you enjoy digging every signal like a mad'un!.. I hope this snippet helps. When I started I tried to hunt with high sensitivity. I was wrong. I found lots more good stuff, and dug wayyy less of 'the rest'  I so wish that the book: Advanced Metal Detecting by Norfolk Wolf was readily available on your side of the Pond for you to buy, keep hold of and read. That book has been my 'bible and staff'. The man that wrote it was 'right'. That man was a true GOAT, and no BS.. So make sure you read your owners manual properly, several times, too. I hope this helps you get better results.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's some very good advice right there .. both John and Tim have taught me more than they'll ever know in the short time this forum has been up .. compare to the other forums where only the "best" detectors are needed to be discussed or one's "greater" ability is far superior to those really wanting to understand.

I started only a few short years ago and still consider myself a beginner. I've stuck with learning one good machine through out. When I started hunting I had the same idea about the ID numbers, but I wanted to hunt rings. I watched many ring hunting videos and converted what numbers I could see on those videos, so as to know what numbers to dig with my machine. Then I came across a video where a guy showed the numbers for a bunch of gold and silver rings .. those rings hit every number on his machine, every single one .. gold rings weren't just at the nickel/pull tab numbers, like everyone was saying, but any number above iron, until it got to where the silver rings began to over lap and take over .. every number on his machine represented either a gold or silver ring .. so I knew that my conversion of the TIDs just wasted a bunch of time and maybe those numbers weren't as important as I was led to believe .. I then spent a bunch of hours trying hard not to look at the screen and just dig what sounded good .. this was harder than you might think .. but it was a step forward in learning to metal detect, or at least for what I want out of metal detecting .. I was also under the assumption that because my machine was capable of locating real deep targets, that I should run it 'wide open' and many told me that was the way to go and how they did it .. for me, that was bad advice .. where I hunt and what I'm listening for is better done on half gain than full gain and to get the best real world workable depth is somewhere in between and site specific .. I've dug some real deep coins .. hunting along a chain link fence is done with less gain than that, often times quarter gain or less is needed .. as far as exact TID numbers for coins is concerned, I have found single nickels, which should be a 58 on my machine, with TID numbers anywhere from 48 to 70 .. and coin spills could be any number as well, especially if there is some other metal along with the coins in that spill .. I don't know how many times I've dug what in all rights should be a trash signal (according to the number) only to find a handful of coins .. silver dimes, especially the older seated dimes, also have a variety of TIDs and many times ring up well below the perfect number of 84 .. depth of the target also has a lot to do with where the TID number rings in. The sound makes the difference and takes a bunch of hours with a machine to understand the machines language, don't get discouraged and treasures will come. Also, it seems that some people have a better ability to understand different machines and the way those machines 'talk' in response to targets .. I think, however, that most people have difficulty with the switch over .. I know I do .. every machine 'talks' differently and it is the user that needs to learn the language to understand what that machine is telling them and that takes some time. Keep with it.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

.....excellent explanations, reasons for them, and logic Scott. Also hugely confidence enhancing for you Rich. As you'll probably  know, quiet confidence and sound, easily digested logic lead to better understandings and most of all ENJOYMENT in your work, hobby/hobbies and other recreational past-times. Scott is  able to give great help to many others that need it, because he is a proper bona -fide metal detectorist. His hauls of coins and artefacts speak for his accrued knowledge and sound application of it. John is no different as an sound honest man. Metal detecting Has to be fun. It Must be experienced as  pleasure, something to look forward to each and every time you prepare to go hunting. As Scott and John have both said recently and in the past, you absolutely do not need to spend heaps of money. You do however need to spend the time. There's no need to go buy a hugely expensive metal detector in the mis-informed hope that it/they will bring rapid success, or to show others that you are a 'Serious Detectorist'. That BS is for the easily led, or weak of conviction a lot of the time. Remember the 125cc to 600cc thang. Transfer that into dollars or pounds...yada yada...get my drift?  Somewhere down the line, in time, you may be thoroughly justified in moving up to the 1,000cc plus class, IF your permissions and/or progression dictate . 'Falling off' a complicated, much harder to set-up, bigger machine sometimes leads to quitting, and the un-doing of all that you have done before. Patience is key. As to self purported 'Experts', those of the, "decades experience" banter and puffed up egos? Take any such person with a 'heaped wheel-barrow full of salt', for the most part. ..Somebody that is given the mantle of concensus that goes into calling them a True/Real expert is a person that is acknowledged as such by very many others that possess enough true knowledge and worldly experience in order for them to give that judgement. It need not take too many decades to gain either, in some instances! Most experts are quietly un-assuming men and women, many of whom do not wish to be lauded as such by others. They never brag, never 'bully', attempt to coerce nor do they posture in any form or dimension. They seek only to be given some respect, and space, the exact kind of respect that they un-failingly give to others within their chosen pusuit, irrespective of 'time-served', expense of equipment, experience, or quantities of finds etc.  They never force their opinion, nor do they mix with any 'In-Crowd/s', or sychophantic hangers on. These real bona fide experts are good Human Beings: part of an ever decreasing 'Rare Breed'. These experts avoid 'the pack'. They are quiet leaders, not raucous followers.  This forum is for those of us that try to follow the path of good Human Beings, our values and intentions are good. If they were not so I think that John would have any us off this forum pretty sharpish. That's my take anyway for what it is worth. I only take part on one forum; this one. It's all I need as a means by which to learn from others, and enjoy their company. No BS here Rich, I guarantee it. Far better for you to ask John for help with the more technical stuff. I'm as much use as teats on a boar hog on that side of matters. Also better to deal with John business wise, too perhaps. The big companies don't offer the one-to-one qualities that the smaller more 'passionate' metal detecting business's does in my op. Over here I deal with a relatively small home-based metal detecting business, run by a good 'hands-on' man, and his woman. I seldom speak with him unless it's for good reason, but do I know that he is always there if I wish to. Good folk are the best to have doings with, especially those that involve a person spending money. '"'Tis who you know" that's best. Nuf sed.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love your motorcycle comparison .. I started riding an Indian 90 when I was very young and after a couple years became real cocky with it .. the neighbor boy (a few years older than I was) had a husqvarna 400 enduro .. I still remember how, when I first let off that clutch, that 2 stroke jumped from underneath me and threw me to the ground .. wasn't cocky anymore. ..lol

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Aye, those Huskys were proper vicious on the power band. Wicked tho' for sure Scott... I owned a Yam IT 465 wayy back in '84, that thing was like a sprint greyhound exploding from the traps. A terrific bike for showing off along the sea-front at Falmouth in the summer-time. It ate chains and sprockets, kicked out blue smoke that smelled wonderful and sounded like a swarm of enraged hornets on a mission. Very 'impressive' 'twas, A real 5-0 magnet, but back then they had to stop you to nail you. Glad I started my time on a Suzi TS 185. I'd a been crippled otherwise, and it'd've been hard to want to 'get back on the log', as 'they' say!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...