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been a quiet couple months of detecting


ScoTTT2
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I've been just not detecting that much lately, to much other things going on .. I have found another barber dime 1902 and yesterday found a 1909 vdb one cent, which I needed for the collection book, it is the first in that series (wheaties) in the book .. other than that just a couple copper rings and usual supply of clad coins. .. still after the 1700s coin (while Tim's digging up the real oldies)

I've been studying the French and Indian War (the Seven Years war) ..it started a couple hours to the south west of where I lived, with George Washington's blunder .. as it turned out it could easily be called WW1 .. but anyway if the Seneca Indians sided with the British instead of the French the whole world would be different now. .. or if the British actually built better guns for the Seneca .. or kept to the promised boundary .. the ending of the late 1750s through early 1760s war brought the taxes and disrespect that started the revolution that formed the US .. this is a whole chunk of history I don't remember learning .. and in high school, it was skimmed over in a day or so .. while the revolution and civil war were taught for a week or two each. .. I would love to hear what was taught in England on the subject .. or in France, for that matter. .. I'm still trying to find anything about where my yard fit into that whole period of time,  as it would seem that it could or should have been a travel route through here or at the very least something.

 

Edited by ScoTTT2
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I have a feeling history is not written the same for each country.  Certainly the lesser facts were skewed to fit each countries narrative of "we are the best".  The rest of the world snickers at the French for "waving the white flag" in battle.  I will assume they find less humor in that and teach they they are tough and mighty and saved the day more than once.    Nice scores on the barber and VDB.  My dad busted out a full IHP and wheat book a while back - floored me as I had no clue he had them.

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Great to hear that you found that 1902 Barber Dime, and especially the sought after 1909 vdb 1 cent for you to fit into your collection book Scott. It's cool to add another 'must try to find' find to the list. I remember not so long back, looking at your huge hauls of coins as well as some really cool artefacts that ulimately won you THGT CIR comp on this forum: whilst I was finding 'Jack' due to s#### weather, or the inability to find much of anything but sub-standard coins and bust up artefacts. Worse still, my bro found that Roman ladies bronze make-up mixing spoon, followed up by it's spatula several days  later, in the same area that I was hunting in!   As far as the English debacles in the Canadas and especially the Americas ( amongst the many cock-up they made : SNAFU ), I know next to zilch. I'm old-version Cornish my friend. Cornish children didn't get taught about  English history at all back in the day, until we were 14 years of age, and then only as part of our  (then) 'O' level exam history module. Up until that age we had our Cornish history drummed into us, as in the pics that John posted up from our 'National' Museum in Truro City, Cornwall. From the Mesolithic to the Industrial Revolution was our 'lot'. We were taught about how the English starved our ancestors through high taxation etc etc, as well as about  the battles we fought and lost against the 'Saxon Heathen'. Many of my Cornish ancestors were slaughtered by the Crown armies in days past. Much is made of the brutal Viking invasions of England, and how the English suffered under the yolk and broad ax of the Norsemen. We Cornish, on the other hand, always got along just fine with the Vikings. Viking long-ships escorting their larger cargo ship made land-fall in Cornwall right through-out the 'Viking Age', bringing with them bars/baulks of Norwegian pitch pine timber, Scandinavian ponies and much other merchandise. These much saught after items were traded by them for our high grade Tin, of which they had none. Pithch pine was perfect for use below ground, so too the small. very hardy ponies, which were superb animals in their own right.. In the year 838 a battle was fought at a place called Hingston Down near Gunnislake in Cornwall. A combined force of Vikings and Cornish were defeated by a numerically superior force of Saxons ( English ). Incidentally Scott, at the furthest reach of the Devoran Estuary of the Truro River there is a pub called 'The Norway Inn'. It is built upon the site of a Cornish/Viking trade site. A Tin smelting foundry has existed near-by from earliest times until the end of the 1800's also, only 100 yards up the road...( see pics of Tin ingots in posts of Museum).   Since the 80's our Cornish history curriculum at schools in Cornwall has been replaced by the history of the English. What I do know for sure certain is that ' Mad' King George the Third totally 'lost his marbles', along with the Americas.... Good! Bloody Crown and it's 'Butchers Apron' ( George Cross Flag of England). The English monarchy have always possessed an utter ruthlessness, from their Edward 1st, until this very day. They possess an inexhaustable greed, lust for control, and a feral ferocity; the ferocity brought by generations of in-breeding. The English people per-se are fine people for the large part. They are good people, many of whom suffered terribly at the hand of cruel masters.  "Long live the United States of America", says I and I.

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