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11/24/21...


ScoTTT2
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Well done Scott. A 1868'er is a real cool find. I 'spect you will already know, but with some coins that seem 'crusty' letting them soak in virgin olive oil for a few months can sometimes help. In the past I've dug copper coins from the early 1700's......... that looked 'less than impressive' ( Roman 'grots', too), but after six months or more submerged in virgin olive oil, and using a 'fibre coin pencil'. e...ver so gently, they've been significantly enhanced. After a gentle clean with the pencil, and a wash-off in warm de-ionised water, I let them dry in a place out of the direct sun. Once dry I give them a coat of Treborius Coin Wax. Many's the time I've been well surprised by some of the results: " Faces come out of the rain".... Even crusty cupro-nickle sixpences and florins etc have come out fine. If you can't find any virgins, then refined olive oil will do 😉

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thanks Tim .. I might just give this a try. .. of the more common coins, a shield nickel has been a rather rare find for me, this being my third (one a year so far) .. even though the first "older than a Jefferson" nickel was a 1875 shield found the first few months I detected.

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Thanks John .. I have no idea on how to date buttons, but it was at 9inches according to the pinpoint function of the T2, same as the nickel (which was a 49-50-51 tid, usually a pass by target id for me) .. I was playing in 1 tone, something I haven't given much thought to nor have I spent any time with, but I will be using this 1 tone more often ... I do hunt a lot in 1+ a totally different target response.

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