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is it better wet or dry?


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During a conversation with a guy I met, who turned out to be the president of a very old metal detecting club about four hours away from me, we got to talking of digging deep targets .. he basically went with the popular belief that it is best to get those deep targets after a rain or when the ground is saturated .. but, I explained, my deepest digs and best hits at depth were last year when we didn't get any rain, not one drop, from the end of April until the best way through August .. actually the T2 hasn't ever run as deep as last year, when the ground was powder dry to at least 20 inches, probably much deeper .. so I got to thinking that running the wet ground is better for those targets that are 'shallow' (deep vs. shallow at the 12 inch mark) and for most machines and hunting styles .. and maybe the targets I was recovering last year couldn't be detected by most machines .. and couldn't be detected by the T2 in the wet because of the amplification of many tiny bits masking the better targets .. fringe targets blocked by everything and anything under the coil .. and ground balancing when the ground is wet and the signals are amplified actually also masks out those good deeper targets .. and if that is the case, wouldn't running without any GB allow for deeper targets to be recovered? .. On the T2 is the preset 90GB actually no GB? .. and finally, if the GB is a filter that might mask out some targets, how can I run the T2 with the least amount of filters or wide open and/or are there other VLF machines better suited for this wide open, unfiltered hunting?
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Shallow and deep targets are both amplified in wet ground. I think it could have been an inert dry spot that was leeched of minerals from previous rain and plant growth if you were getting depth like that in dry ground. Once the plants die off in a section - supreme depth can be had.


That being said - whether it is wet or dry - no detector can handle true masking. So if the shallow targets are amplified from wet soil - they would for sure amplify any masking they had going on. The deeper targets would not be amplified in that case since the detector could not see past the masked target anyways.


I can never see a scenario where not ground balancing is a benefit. If there is no filtering the GB provides - you will literally pick up the Earth as a main target and lose depth instead of increase it. There will be no way to see past the soil to the coins responsive signal - wet or dry. Running positive or negative almost always comes with a larger caveat (usually ground chatter) than the extra depth provided. 90 on the T2 is 90...not off. They set it to Texas soil most likely. I know they have soil from all over the world imported for testing - but 90 is pretty high and I will assume is positive for most people. I run 92-94 here in some spots...but 84-88 is normal for me. The US is pretty geolocigally diverse, but I want to say most places are 75-85 range. Most Garrett and First Texas machines with a fixed GB have it set at 82 or 84.


50 is going to be inert or close to it. 0 is salt and 99 is straight magnetite...so I will assume 50ish is the middle flat spot. Might want to give that a try next time is rains.

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Thanks John .. I never considered that live vs. dead grass would be a factor .. and it could very well be that I was actually running right on top of the soil, instead of the difference the height of the grass makes.


So when I ground balance is the machine balancing to the top of the soil or making an average the whole length for the sending signal or somewhere in between?

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It sends the signal as deep as all-metal mode would. When ground balancing it just switches the machine to a non-motion based all-metal basically - similar to pinpointing. The difference is the CPU programming tries to adjust to a center balanced point for RX signal - while in pinpointing it is searching for the peak point of the RX signal.

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Yep, you covered the 'wet/dry' bases perfectly I reckon John. Wet/damp soil is massively better if searching for the tiny, thin section coins. 'Normal' size coins obviously show out better per se, but to find tiny medieval cut 1/4s and 1/2's; damp ground rules: especially after an electrical storm has passed through. Nothing like a bit of 'Mothers Fork' to wake the metal !!!
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