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the jefferson only drought is over


ScoTTT2
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Thanks John .. I see a barber quarter in your near future.


I took a challenge from another youtuber to see how many targets it takes to get a piece of gold .. so I was digging everything .. this was very scratchy sounding and I usually would have passed on digging it.

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Proper Job Scott! ...I'm totally 'not up' on U.S currency, but I can sense you are pleased, so I am pleased for you also. For me, there's a MASSIVE difference betetween a 'Scratchy' signal, and the ubiquitous ( I can't get to grips with tonal I.D recognition ), 'Iffy' signal. You definitely know your MD's 'language' without it having to 'Raise its' Voice', or spell the magic vdi out.... Bang on Scott... If it's scratchy it's worth taking a spade-full out to hear if it 'rounds up', if it's 'jagged', shifts pin-point, or clips iron tonal, leave well alone; in my op. 'Dig it all' = " Haven't yet embraced the ability to learn the subtle, yet obvious, to a greater rather than lesser extent, quality of 'differences ' of my, hugely expensive, 'serious' MD.... I've been on club digs where people who should know better due to' time served', have adopted a 'learned' stance, and stood there waving the coil of their Deus/ Fib, yada yada. to and fro twenty, thirty, forty, or more times over a target, shifting angles of attack, swinging some more, with their head cocked like a fox listening to voles beneath the snow, and eventually digging up a half horse-shoe, or a jagged bit of scrap...Crazy... It almost seemed, to me, that their respective antics would eventually manifest the ability to enable ferrous scrap to morph into non-ferrous artefacts/ coins etc! Funny as #### to see :lol: :roll:
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Thanks Tim .. the Liberty Head Nickel or V Nickel was the first US coin designed by Charles Barber in 1883 it was in production until 1913 and the buffalo nickel took it's place .. Charles Barber went on to design a dime, quarter, and half dollar in 1892 and these coins remained in production until 1916, the Barber half dollar ended it's production in 1915 .. the value of this nickel isn't much, even at a mint state .. but still it's 110 yrs. old and not the modern Jefferson nickel that has plagued me so far this year .. the Jefferson nickel has been around since 1938 pretty much in the same form.


I'm sure that many detector coils passed over this find, seeing it was only 6 inches deep or so and real close to a swimming area of a popular park .. I normally would have passed on this too .. but I was going for gold and an ear ring would have a similar sound .. I really don't know the TID .. I normally dig any sound that is solid and never take the time to decide if it is something I might not want to dig .. by the time I find and/or pinpoint the target my mind is made up on to dig or not to dig .. looking for gold, here though, is jewelry, mostly and can be almost any configuration, any orientation in the ground and mixed with all sorts of other metals, there is nothing consistent about hunting gold jewelry, so the sounds are the same or similar to much of the modern trash in the places where it is found and can be found anywhere on the TID scale of the T2 .. then take into account that I am usually hunting rings, which covers every number above iron and small gold rings could even dip down into the iron range ..I usually run the T2 with a lower sensitivity 50-70 and disc out iron to about 27 or so and 1+ in the tones and dig everything repeatable .. not really caring on what numbers come up .. I'm hunting fast and relatively shallow, 8 inches or less ..get a hit, pin point, dig and move on to the next one .. and I expect to dig a bunch of bad targets hunting like this .. but gold can sink pretty deep in a short amount of time and I know I am walking over the top of many gold items .. those are the signals I've been trying to learn lately and the best way to do that is by starting with deep coins .. you can cherry pick coins because they are consistent .. the TIDs aren't always the same, but the signal is, for the most part.

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Cheers for this info Scott! Totally 'Bang On'!!! This is what a proper forum with good folks is great for. U.S coinage is very interesting to me, so too US History in general, so to gain knowledgedirect from source is much appreciated.. You most definitely know how to use a metal detector correctly Scott, so you will obviously find coins etc that the 'If in doubt, Flat - Out' crew/disciples will miss. It's refreshing to meet another a proper good fellow detectorist. Best of luck to those that screw the discrimination abilities of their MD's by whacking everything on their machines' controls to 'Trans-Warp Factor 10'. Imagine, spending so much money and investing in a high-end' machine that you fail to get much true benifit from...".Ignorance being bliss", I guess it really doesn't matter. To each their own. BTW Scott, my eldest daughter visited the U.S three or four years back. Before herself returned I asked her to fetch me back some U.S coins, ranging from nickels to half-dollars, silver and clads of all coins, plus copper 'Wheats' and IHPs that herself sourced. These coins are great for testing my two U.S MD's with, in conjunction with Johns reviews/ tests of both MDs. "Just sayin'"....................
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